Hurricane Ida Makes Landfall in Louisiana Hurricane Ida is seen in this image taken aboard the International Space Station. Image credit: European Space Agency
04 Sep 2021

Hurricane Ida causes severe flooding - State of Emergency announced in New York

Heavy rainstorms caused floods when Hurricane Ida pulled in along the east coast of the United States during the past week. At least 15 people have allegedly become victims of the severe weather conditions brought on by Ida.

Hurricane Ida has been moving upwards upwards along the east coast of the USA. The intensity if the wind has decreased, but nevertheless, large amounts of rain has fallen. 

Ida was initially classified as a hurricane but was later downgraded to a storm. Earlier this week, Ida struck the southeastern United States, where it caused extensive property damage, power outages and claimed at least six lives in the states of Alabama and Louisiana.

The states of Philadelphia and New Jersey have also been affected by floods. At least six people have been killed there, NBC reports. Eight people perished when basements were flooded in New York, and another person has died in New Jersey.

In New York City, more than 170 millimeters of rain fell in just over six hours, which has led to severe flooding. The city's subway train system was flooded and all underground traffic had to be stopped. .

Mayor Bill de Blasio declared a state of emergency and residents were urged not to go outside.

 

Photo Credit: (Cover Photo above) 

Hurricane Ida Makes Landfall in Louisiana

Hurricane Ida is seen in this image taken aboard the International Space Station. The dangerous hurricane made landfall in Louisiana on Sunday, Aug. 29, 2021, with maximum sustained winds of 150 miles per hour, or 241 kilometers per hour. The image was shared on European Space Agency astronaut and Expedition 65 crew member Thomas Pesquet's Twitter account, as the storm churned in the Gulf of Mexico ahead of its landfall.

From space,  Earth-observing satellites have a unique view of storms. These observations provide data that help NASA work with partner agencies, including the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, to better understand hurricanes, and support preparation and disaster response. Learn more about hurricane monitoring.

Image credit: European Space Agency

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